Kitchen Gardens A beginners guide Home improvement advice - Gardens

Kitchen Gardens A beginners guide overview

In its simplest form, a kitchen garden produces fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs for delicious, healthy meals. A kitchen garden doesn't have to be right outside the kitchen door, but the closer it is, the better.
If you have to choose between a sunny spot or a close one, pick the sunny one. The best location for a new garden is one receiving full sun (at least six hours of direct sunlight per day), and one where the soil drains well. If no puddles remain a few hours after a good rain, you know your site drains well.
After you've figured out where the sun shines longest and strongest, your next task will be to define your kitchen garden goals. My first recommendation for new gardeners is to start small, tuck a few successes under your belt in year one, and scale up little by little.
More talented gardeners with more generous soils and climates are able to produce more food in less space, but maximizing production is not our only goal. We?re also trying to maximize pleasure and health, both our own and that of the garden. Kitchen gardens and gardeners thrive because of positive feedback loops. If your garden harvests taste good and make you feel good, you will feel more motivated to keep on growing.
The most important recommendation after "start small" is "start with what you like to eat." This may go without saying, but I have seen first-year gardens that don?t reflect the eating habits of their growers ? a recipe for disappointment. That said, I believe in experimenting with one or two new crops per year that aren?t necessarily favorites for the sake of having diversity in the garden and on our plates.
One of the easiest and most rewarding kitchen gardens is a simple salad garden. Lettuces and other greens don?t require much space or maintenance, and grow quickly. Consequently, they can produce multiple harvests in most parts of the country.

Kitchen Gardens A beginners guide